Cheese and Rosemary Brioche

Disclaimer: This is not my recipe all the credit goes to Bake from Scratch the recipe is linked: here

Something I am trying to do more in 2021, is make more savory baked goods. Don’t get me wrong I absolutely love sweet cookies or blondies, but it’s good to have a change of pace and not get my boyfriend so burnt out on cookies. So I’m starting this year strong with a Cheese and Rosemary Brioche. I have to be honest, the last time I made a yeast bread it went terribly wrong. The yeast never activated and I over filled it with filling. It turned into this dense liquid mess. With this yeast bread though I took my time and made sure to pay attention to baking clues like yeast foaming and make sure the warm milk wasn’t even a degree too hot! (That’s what happened last time). I will try that bread again! But getting back to this one…I made this recipe from the Bake from Scratch Bread Collection cookbook and they called for double cream, cream cheese. I couldn’t find the double cream version but the normal full fat was perfect for me. I like this bread because the cream cheese and rosemary is mixed into it, rather than being spread and twisted. By using the mixing technique it ensured the add-ins were distributed throughout the bread in more of a sporadic way, which I enjoy. Brioche bread is a buttery, flaky dough, which makes for the perfect; breakfast, snack, or side.

Recipe

Makes: 2 (9×5-inch) loaves, caution: 8 hours + chilling time

Disclaimer: This is not my recipe all the credit goes to Bake from Scratch the recipe is linked: here

Ingredients

  • ⅓ cup (80 grams) warm whole milk (110°F/43°C)
  • 3 tablespoons (36 grams) granulated sugar
  • 1 tablespoon (9 grams) active dry yeast
  • 3¼ cups (406 grams) all-purpose flour, divided
  • 6 large eggs (300 grams), room temperature and divided
  • 1 teaspoon (3 grams) kosher salt
  • 1 cup (227 grams) unsalted butter, softened
  • 10.5 oz (315 grams) double-cream cheese, cubed
  • 2 tablespoons (4 grams) chopped fresh rosemary
  • 1 tablespoon (15 grams) water

Directions

  1. In the bowl of a stand mixer fitted with the paddle attachment, combine warm milk, sugar, and yeast. Let stand for 10 minutes.
  2. Add 1½ cups (188 grams) flour and 5 eggs (250 grams) to yeast mixture, and beat at medium-low speed until smooth, 2 to 3 minutes. Cover and let stand until small bubbles form around edges of mixture, 30 to 45 minutes.
  3. Switch to the dough hook attachment. Add salt and remaining 1¾ cups (218 grams) flour. Beat at medium speed until dough pulls away from sides of bowl and is smooth and elastic, 8 to 10 minutes.
  4. With mixer on medium speed, add butter, 1 tablespoon (14 grams) at a time, beating until combined after each addition. Add cheese and rosemary. (See Note.)
  5. Spray a large bowl with cooking spray. Place dough in bowl, turning to grease top. Cover and let rise in a warm, draft-free place (75°F/24°C) until doubled in size, 1½ to 2½ hours.
  6. Turn out dough onto a lightly floured surface, and fold a few times to knock out a bit of air. Return dough to greased bowl; cover and refrigerate for at least 8 hours or overnight (up to 16 hours).
  7. Lightly spray 2 (9×5-inch) loaf pans with cooking spray.
  8. Divide dough into 6 portions (about 200 grams each). On a lightly floured surface, roll each portion into a 12-inch-long rope. Braid 3 ropes of dough very tightly. Place in 1 prepared pan, tucking ends under. Repeat procedure with remaining 3 ropes of dough and remaining prepared pan. Cover and let rise in a warm, draft-free place (75°F/24°C) until doubled in size, 1 to 1½ hours.
  9. Preheat oven to 350°F (180°C).
  10. In a small bowl, whisk together 1 tablespoon water and remaining 1 egg (50 grams). Brush egg wash over dough.
  11. Bake for 30 minutes. Cover with foil, and bake until an instant-read thermometer inserted in center registers 190°F (88°C), 15 to 20 minutes more. Serve warm.

Notes: If cheese and rosemary don’t incorporate well in the mixer, turn out onto a lightly floured surface and knead by hand until everything is evenly distributed.

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